Georgia Grassroots Nonprofits Unite: The Green Equity Toolkit – Standards and Strategies for Advancing Race, Gender and Economic Equity in the Green Economy, Plus Georgia’s TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs, and honoring Cora Lee Johnson

Fighting for Racial, Green and Social Equity

Green Equity Toolkit

The Green Equity Toolkit:

Standards and Strategies for Advancing Race, Gender and Economic Equity in the Green Economy

The Authors of the Green Equity Toolkit:

Yvonne Yen Liu   and   Terry Keleher

Green Equity Toolkit Webinar:

Applied Research Center:
Racial Justice Through Media, Research and Activism

http://www.ARC.org

Applied Research Center
900 Alice Street
Suite 400
Oakland, CA
94607

510-653-3415

Applied Research Center:
Rinku Sen, Executive Director
Dominique Apollo, Research Director
Christina Chen, Research Assistant
Jonathan C. Yee, Research Assistant
Kathryn Duggan, Copy Editor
Hatty Lee, Art and Design Director
Debayani Kar, Communications Manager
Regina Acebo, Network Coordinator
Channing Kennedy, Multimedia Production Associate

Advisory Committee:
Elena Foshay, Research Associate, Apollo Alliance
Stacy Ho, Policy Associate, Green for All
Rubén Lizardo, Associate Director, PolicyLink
Billy Parish, Co-Founder, Energy Action Coalition and Fellow at Ashoka
Raquel Pinderhughes, Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, San Francisco State University
Chris Rabb, Visiting Researcher, The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Fellow at Demos
Jeff Rickert, Director, AFL-CIO Green Jobs Center
Juhu Thukral, Director of Law and Advocacy, The Opportunity Agenda
Hashim Yeomans-Benford, Community Organizer, Miami Workers Center

Scroll down to read a portion of the Green Toolkit and important related links

——-

Green Energy JobsTreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs

Homero Leon, Jr., pro bono attorney Georgia Legal Services Program
hleon@glsp.org

Marcia Watson, volunteer for Georgia Legal Services Program
MWatson@glsp.org

Wallace Little, educator in Truetlen County
wallacelittle@hotmail.com

TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs is a project of the historic nonprofit:

Women sew dolls at the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc.

Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc.
c/o Cora Johnson, Executive Director
104 Martin Luther King Drive
Soperton, Georgia
30457

912-529-6238 (office)

Honoring Ms. Cora Lee Johnson, president and founder of Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc. and TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs:

Cora Lee Johnson, member of the Southern Partners Fund
http://www.spfund.org/Members/tabid/55/Default.aspx
http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/ga/rcdi.htm

Cora Lee Johnson is featured in two books that honor women who have dared to dream and have made a great difference in American and World history:

Cora Lee Johnson is among courageous women featured in the book "I Dream a World"

I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America
Photography by Pulitzer Prize-winner Brian Lanker
Edited by Barbara Summers
Foreword by Maya Angelou

Women of Courage: Inspiring Stories from the Women Who Lived Them
By Katherine Martin

(Scroll down to see more about the books, reviews and media coverage)

Cora Lee Johnson of Soperton, Georgia testified about “the struggle to obtain better housing, health care and nutrition” while testifying about “Economic Adjustment and Marginalization” during a summit about the “Global Campaign for Women’s Human Rights.”

The conference was entitled “From Vienna to Beijing: Copenhagen Hearing on Economic Justice and Women’s Human Rights” at the “United Nations World Summit On Social Development” in Copenhagen in March 1995

To read the original .pdf document with the testimony by Cora Lee Johnson click on this link:

Cora Lee Johnson testifies in Copenhagen
http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/globalcenter/publications/copen.pdf

Cora Lee Johnson, founder of the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, was featured in Mother Jones Magazine in January 1988

Photo of Cora Lee Johnson from 1988 Mother Jones Magazine

Article about Cora Lee Johnson in Mother Jones Magazine click on this link:
http://books.google.com/books?id=L-cDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PT32&ots=U4HADOlQkL&dq=Treutlen%20County%20Community%20Sewing%20Center%20georgia&pg=PT31#v=twopage&q&f=false

Cora Lee Johnson, a native of Treutlen County and lifelong resident of the State of Georgia, has spent the better part of her adult life as a dedicated Christian, advocating for the rights and the better quality of life for poor people.

Through the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, which she founded, Ms. Johnson is providing training for low-income women to acquire and develop skills for jobs in the local clothing factories.

As a result of her efforts, the poor people of Treutlen County are enjoying subsidized housing, a welfare center for food stamp recipients and a health clinic.

Cora also travels around the country to other communities inspiring others to work to improve their lives.

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/It%27s+Official.+Glory+Foods+Southern+Selections+Is+a+Winner!+New…-a020471138

The Georgia Legal Services Program is building the capacities of rural nonprofit organizations, including the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center in Soperton, to build affordable housing, develop micro enterprises, and provide green job training for low-income residents.

Recognizing the talents and green projects by Van Jones, senior fellow at the Center For American Progress and a senior policy advisor at Green For All

Author/Green Jobs Advocate Van Jones:

Green Jobs advocate Van Jones wrote “Rebuild The Dream” – and the New York Times bestseller “The Green-Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems

Rebuild The Dream banner

“Those of us working to reinvent and rebuild the American Dream are ‘deep patriots’ – We are truly fighting for ‘liberty and justice for all.’ Not for some. For everybody.

We believe that everyone deserves access to the American dream.

“You and I have seen our share of ‘cheap patriots’ — the ones who want to help the wealthiest Americans to shortchange America’s government on tax day. The ones who sing ‘America the Beautiful’ – but do nothing to defend her beauty from big polluters. The ones who hide their bigotry behind the flag, rather than ensuring that all Americans receive the promises of life, liberty, and equal protection under the law”
— Van Jones

Rebuild The Dream free sticker

Get your free “Rebuild the Dream” sticker click here to get yours.

email Rebuild the Dream
info@rebuildthedream.com

Author and Green Jobs Advocate Van Jones

His website VanJones.net states the book makes “the case that government should make it easier for private sector innovation” adding that Jones believes in pro-business, market-based ideas.

Jones is a “former Obama White House advisor” and a champion for strengthening the American economy, our energy security and creating jobs,” his websites state.

Jones served as the “Special Advisor for Green Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation” at the “White House Council on Environmental Quality.”

He has been instrumental in successful partnerships with green businesses and served on the board of a national business association.

Van Jones
“The Green Collar Economy: In Search of Eco-Equity” in Applied Research Center’s “Compact for Racial Justice – An Agenda for Fairness and Unity”
Applied Research Center
http://www.arc.org/images/fr08/arc_compact_11209.pdf
http://www.arc.org

http://vanjones.net
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Jones
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/van-jones
https://twitter.com/#!/VanJones68
@VanJones68

The Green Collar Economy by Van Jones

Van Jones book entitled “The Green-Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems” on Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/Green-Collar-Economy-Solution-Problems/dp/0061650757
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Green_Collar_Economy


Official website of the Van Jones book entitled “Rebuild the Dream
http://www.rebuildthedream.com

Author and Green Jobs Advocate Van Jones

“Rebuild The Dream” on Twitter:
http://www.RebuildTheDream.com
@RebuildDream

——-

Join our Green Grassroots Team:

Homero Leon, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
770-309-6216
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/homero-leon/32/b99/695

Rev. Terence A. Dicks
Augusta, Georgia
706-306-5731

“Claiming A Street Named King” on YouTube
News Story: Terence Dicks appointed chairman of Augusta Human Relations Commission
Terence Dicks on Facebook
Terence Dicks on Flickr – PhotoStream
Terence Dicks on Flickr – Profile
Terence Dicks on Google
Terence Dicks on LinkedIn
Terence Dicks on MySpace
Terence Dicks on Twitter
Terence Dicks on Viddler
Terence Dicks on Yahoo

Thank you to partners like Dr. Yomi Noibi, ECO-Action Exec. Dir. (see more below)

Green Technology:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_technology

http://www.green-technology.org
http://www.green-technology.org/what.htm

Endless Solar Energy

Solar Electric Cars via Wikipedia

Electric Vehicles from Solar Power
Using solar energy, electric vehicles get an energy charge at an autonomous mobile station (Photovoltaic ombrière SUDI) in November 2010.
Photo by Wikipedia username Tatmouss aka Russet Grebe and in French Grèbe Roussâtre
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ombri%C3%A8re_SUDI_-_Sustainable_Urban_Design_%26_Innovation.jpg
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utilisateur:Tatmouss

Solar Power:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power

Wind Power:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power

Desalinization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination

——-

Selected and some updated information from the Green Toolkit about Green Jobs and the Green Economy

The emerging Green Economy holds the potential to transform our entire economy and environment toward much-needed stability and sustainability.

An expansive notion of green sector development recognizes that nature has no boundaries.

It applies not only to what is thought of as organic but also to the built environment, including our full communities and the people living in them.

The concept of green is eco-friendly and people-friendly.

It is holistic and humane.

An equitable notion of green sector development and employment recognizes that ecosystems are inclusive and interconnected.

It strives to evenly distribute opportunities, benefits and safeguards.

If we leave any part behind, it affects the whole.

Green for All, a national organization working to build an inclusive Green Economy offers the definition of green-collar jobs as “well-paid, career track jobs that contribute directly to preserving or enhancing environmental quality.

If a job improves the environment, but doesn’t provide a family supporting wage or a career ladder to move low-income workers into higher-skilled occupations, it is not a green-collar job.

In addition to preserving the earth, the following benefits also apply:

Green Jobs pay higher wages than the wages paid in comparable conventional gray jobs

Green Jobs are harder to export

Green Jobs are more likely to be unionized

In addition to protecting and improving the environment, Green Jobs can be a boon to economic recovery and stimulus.

They provide a potential solution for millions of workers who find themselves unemployed and under-employed due to the economic downturn.

The Apollo Alliance concluded that up to five million jobs could be created with a national investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy of $500 billion over 10 years.

A report prepared for the United Nations environment program concluded that every $1 billion in the U.S.

Government spending in green initiatives would lead to approximately 30,000 job years in this country, which is a 20 percent increase in job creation over traditional economic stimulus measures.

The emerging Green Economy is characterized by environmental protection and energy efficiency, community self reliance and well-being, and stability and sustainability.

This contrasts with the traditional Gray Economy, which is characterized by environmental degradation, wastefulness, fossil fuel dependency, human exploitation and economic instability.

Green Jobs fall into 12 occupational sectors, including some familiar to the Gray Economy such as transportation and others new to the Green Economy such as weatherization.

The sectors span the economy, from agriculture and forestry to government and regulatory.

A report by the National Center for O*Net Development, prepared for the Department Of Labor (DOL) and other workforce agencies, further categorizes these occupations based on whether they are:

1. Existing gray jobs with increased demand in the Green Economy

2. Jobs requiring enhanced green skills, also known as green enhanced skills

3. Entirely new jobs or what O*Net named green new and emerging occupations.

O*NET Resource Center is created for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration by the National Center for O*NET Development.
http://www.onetcenter.org
http://www.onetcenter.org/green.html
http://www.onetcenter.org/dl_files/GreenRef.pdf
email O*NET Customer Service

Off shore wind turbines bathed in mist and warm autumnal sunshine in Oct. 2007. The turbines are located on Burbo Bank about 4 miles offshore Photo from geograph.org.uk

Wind Turbines Provided Endless Wind Power:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power
Off shore wind turbines bathed in mist and warm autumnal sunshine in Oct. 2007.
The turbines are located on Burbo Bank about 4 miles offshore
Photo from geograph.org.uk
Photo by Steve Fareham
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pretty_flamingos_-_geograph.org.uk_-_578705.jpg

The promise of eco-equity:

What is equity?

What are equitable policies?

Equity is a principle that calls for fairness, inclusion and justice.

It can be distinguished from the principle of diversity, which is primarily about variety.

Equitable policies often require concrete actions and steps beyond simply making everyone “equal before the law,” and accordingly are designed to take appropriate account of historical and contemporary injustices and unequal outcomes.

Gray Economy:

The Green Economy encompasses the economic activity related to reducing the use of fossil fuels, decreasing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, increasing the efficiency of energy usage, recycling materials, and developing and adopting renewable sources of energy.

The conventional Gray Economy, often contrasted with the emerging Green Economy, is characterized by a post-industrial revolution model where profits are routinely permitted to be derived from the pollution of air, water and land; the exploitation and under-compensation of workers; the creation of environmental-related illnesses; the disproportionate dumping of toxins in low-income communities of color; and the creation of wealth stratification and deep poverty.

Global usage of PCBs by ton

Although there are dramatic differences between the gray and green economies, there are too many instances where so-called Green Jobs are low-wage and dead-end, where women and people of color are excluded, and where working conditions are unsafe and workers’ rights are ignored.

When policymakers and green firms don’t consciously weave equity into a strategy for developing the Green Economy – the resulting Green Jobs are not guaranteed to be any more equitable or sustainable than jobs in the Gray Economy.

Yet, the federal and local governments that are funding green job initiatives are not building equity considerations explicitly into their planning and development process.

To maximize the opportunities and benefits of the Green Economy, we must think of green development expansively and equitably.

Otherwise, we could easily end up reconstituting the Gray Economy with a tint of green, instead of replacing the gray with true green.

Without equity standards, the potential Green Economy continues to be gray in five areas:

• Green Pathways, But Not Career Pathways:
Much of the literature on “green-collar jobs” focuses on low-skill, entry-level work that does not require previous experience or education.

Many of these jobs are accessible to men and women who have barriers to employment.

Although these jobs may function well as entry-level jobs into the Green Economy, continued training, education and certification must be made available to people who have employment barriers to ensure that they are able to advance within their workplace or their chosen profession.

Without explicit measures for advancement, people of color and women will likely remain at the bottom of the career ladder.

Green Job Training Charade:

Historically, people of color and women have too often been trained for entry-level, low-quality jobs.

Since the 1980s, much of the federal funding for workforce development has supported training over actual job creation.

For example, under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), training is funded but actual jobs are not.

Therefore, young and adult workers graduate from training without a job awaiting them.

In addition, training programs and providers haven’t been linked to union apprenticeship programs.

As a result, graduates have been unable to secure specialized skill jobs or the pathways they provide into the middle class.

Training providers for high-quality jobs must make workforce development accessible to groups who are most structurally disadvantaged in our society.

• Bad Green Jobs:

Green Jobs suffer from the same abuses that pervade the Gray Economy.

In some cases, so-called “Green Jobs” have paid even lower wages and offered fewer opportunities for collective representative than their gray counterparts.

A 2009 good jobs first report found that existing Green Jobs are not more likely to be represented by a labor union or provide safe and healthy working conditions for their employees.

Although green wages can be higher than those paid for comparable gray jobs – an hourly wage for a “green job” can be as low as $8.

For example, that’s what a Los Angeles recycling center paid its mostly undocumented immigrant workforce.

A family comprised of an adult and one child would need to make more than double that per hour ($19) in order to sustain itself in that region.

Exclusionary Employment:

A look at the existing race and gender demographics comprising the Green Economy reveals vast race and gender disparities.

White men dominate green occupations across all sectors, according to 2008 census data.

Analysis by the women of color policy network showed that black and Latinos comprise less than 30 percent of those employed in green industries and occupations.

Gender disparities are even starker.

Black women are employed in only 1.5 percent of jobs in the energy sector, and it’s even worse for Latino and Asian women, who are employed at 1.0 percent and 0.7 percent, respectively.

• White Executives in Green Firms:

Applied Research Center (ARC) analyzed racial demographics of employees in executive and management positions in green sectors.

Two sectors that expect huge growth in the Green Economy – construction and energy – exhibit vast racial disparities.

Construction is dominated by white executives, with 90.5 percent of construction companies led by whites, but only 7.1 percent led by Latinos, 0.9 percent by Asians and 0.8 percent by blacks.

In the energy sector, 90.9 percent of energy companies are led by whites, 3.8 percent by Latinos, 3.1 percent by blacks and 1.8 percent by Asians.

When creating Green Jobs, our eyes must be on quality and equity.

We must consciously strive, and concretely plan, to achieve racial, gender and economic equity.

The communities most traditionally marginalized by our society, and those most adversely affected by the recession — people of color, women, and low-income and moderate-income families — deserve priority attention when creating new opportunities.

This toolkit provides a guide for incorporating racial, gender and economic equity into the design, implementation and evaluation of initiatives involving Green Jobs.

If equity factors prominently into the equation, an expanded Green Economy has tremendous potential to positively transform all our communities, sustain our whole environment and lift the quality of all our lives.

But this won’t happen by chance.

We must organize to ensure that equity — gender, racial and economic equity — is central to green principles and practice.

“The world we dream of has more than just a stable, healthy climate. We dream of a society that also takes care of its people, where no one is left behind and everyone has a chance to succeed. That society upholds three basic principles: equal protection for all, equal opportunity for all, and reverence for all creation.”

—Van Jones, The Green Collar Economy

This toolkit provides a framework for explicitly addressing race, gender and economic equity in initiatives involving green-collar jobs.

Because institutions at all levels routinely (albeit often unintentionally) replicate such inequities, advancing equity requires commitment, conscious attention and concrete steps.

This toolkit provides guidance for designing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating initiatives that establish green-collar jobs.

It can be applied to the public and/or private sector, in both for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

Each job’s program is unique, with its own funding stream, development and implementation entities, and applicable state and federal laws.

Accordingly, the following suggested practices will need to be adapted to fit each specific initiative.

This toolkit focuses on Green Jobs initiated in the public arena:
Jobs created by cities or counties or those funded by federal or state monies won by green contractors.

First, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), enacted in February 2009, will disburse $787 billion in stimulus funds over the next 10 years, with most of the money allocated in 2009–2010.

  • More than $200 billion was earmarked for programs that would directly or indirectly generate Green Jobs
  • $100 billion reserved for transportation and infrastructure
  • $48 billion for workforce development and education
  • $41 billion for programs relating to energy
  • $20 billion towards tax incentives for solar, wind and other forms of green energy

Stimulus funds recipients must comply with all anti-discrimination statutes, regulations and executive orders.

The public jobs provide avenues to demand accountability, transparency and equity in spending.

Using various public accountability provisions, equity advocates can exert pressure on elected officials and administrators to ensure that green projects are created, funded, administered, regulated and monitored in ways that produce equitable outcomes.

Advocates can also ask private-sector businesses or organizations to voluntarily comply with suggested equity principles, practices and desired outcomes.

Public entities can also be asked to require compliance from private entities that are being publicly funded or regulated.

How to use this toolkit

Build Community Support for Equity

• Develop a broad base of community residents and advocates who are willing to advocate for race, gender and economic equity in local green-jobs initiatives

• Ask allies to adopt the equity principles

• Develop a coalition to work on behalf of green equity

• Develop publicity and public support for gender, race and economic equity in green-jobs initiatives.

• Highlight existing inequities to demonstrate the need for new approaches

• Support the development and promotion of equitable funding proposals

• Publicly critique proposals that ignore or fall short on equity considerations

• Actively monitor program implementation to ensure that equity plans are being carried out effectively

• Ask for full reporting on progress and results

• Participate in developing and evaluating program performance and advocate for needed changes

Endless Energy Equals Solar Power

Solucar PS10 is the first solar thermal power plant based on tower in the world that generates electricity in a commercial way.

Solar Power:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power

Solúcar PS10 is the first solar thermal power plant based on tower in the world that generates electricity in a commercial way.
Source: Solúcar PS10
Photo taken in September 2007 by Wikipedia username afloresm aka Alejandro Flores in Sevilla, Spain
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PS10_solar_power_tower.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/people/74424373

Engage Public Officials in Equity

• Ask public officials and entities responsible for Green-Jobs decisions to commit to using the success indicators

• Ask public officials and involved entities to adopt your proposed practices, desired outcomes and success indicators

• Be sure all plans have concrete goals, milestones and timetables for achieving equity, with ample funding, enforcement and support

• Ask public officials and involved entities to adopt a participatory process for making decisions about green-jobs proposals, with ample opportunities for public input and review, especially from key stakeholders such as marginalized communities

• Ask public officials and involved entities to commit to comprehensive data collection — disaggregated by gender, race and socioeconomic status — so that programs can be effectively monitored and evaluated

Stay informed

• Continue to connect with equity advocates in different communities to stay abreast of innovative and best practices

In the future, ARC and its allies will be creating additional resources to supplement this toolkit. Periodically check the ARC website for future content such as case studies, model policies, research reports and additional advocacy tools

Equal opportunity and Fair Treatment:

• All people are afforded full and fair access to all opportunities and benefits, free of bias and barriers, with all programs designed to be inclusive and representative of the demographics of the communities in which they are based.

Excellence and Efficacy:

• Jobs are high-quality, and job programs are highly effective and specifically tailored to building strong skills and career paths for marginalized communities, so as to maximize the shared benefits and transformative potential of the Green Economy

Health and Wellness:

• The health, safety and well-being of all individuals and communities are maximized, with active attention to eliminating existing disparities.

• Human rights and workers’ rights all employees and community residents are guaranteed basic rights and respect, including the right to organize and engage in collective advocacy.

Sustainability and security:

• Households and communities are provided the support and protections needed for longterm economic security and environmental sustenance.

This includes affordable housing, access to public transportation and proximity to a high-quality education for children.

Transparency and Accountability:

• Openness and fairness are maintained in all phases of planning, decision-making, program development, implementation, documentation and evaluation, with public participation of community stakeholders, particularly those most disadvantaged.

Equity goals

Green Jobs should be good jobs that not only improve the environmental health of our communities and nation, but also pay sustainable wages and benefits to the worker, provide a safe and healthy work environment, and enable the employee to advocate for his or her interests collectively through participation in a union.

Green Jobs are also pathways into stable careers, where employees can start at an entry-level job and work their way up with more experience and skills.

Economic Equity:

• Increase economic stability and reduce poverty by ensuring that economically disadvantaged people and communities have full and fair access to high-quality jobs, improved community services and environment, access to affordable housing and public transportation, and expanded opportunities

Gender Equity:

• Create opportunities and outcomes that ensure that women have full and fair access to all jobs and contracts, and that all benefits and burdens are shared and bias-free.

Racial Equity:

• Create opportunities and outcomes that ensure that people of color have full and fair access to all jobs and contracts, and that all benefits and burdens are shared and bias-free.

Disadvantaged communities with barriers to employment disadvantaged communities with barriers to employment disadvantaged communities include people with low incomes, women, people of color, at-risk youth, people who lack a high school degree or GED, people with prior convictions, immigrants and refugees of varying status, youth of color, public-assistance recipients, people who have been chronically unemployed or underemployed, parents with childcare needs, under-skilled job-seekers, people with disabilities and other vulnerable communities.

Equity outcomes

• Transparent and participatory planning and evaluation process

The implementation of a fully transparent and participatory process for equitable green job creation should be seen as an outcome itself.

Without explicit attention to race and gender equity, and ample participation in planning by people of color and women, we can predict from past experience that the jobs created will not be inclusive and equitable.

Transparency includes comprehensive equity data collection that includes data disaggregated by race, gender and socioeconomic status.

This data should be fully accessible, searchable and mappable.

A participatory planning process includes the development of ample opportunities for input and review during program development and evaluation, especially by disadvantaged community stakeholders.

• Maximization and equitable distribution of high-quality jobs

The number of high-quality jobs that are created and filled should be maximized and incentivized, with an aim to distribute them proportionally by race, gender and income level.

High-quality jobs are those that meet or exceed prevailing wage standards, include full and sustainable benefits such as health insurance and retirement funding, involve safe working conditions, are generally full-time, have clear career tracks and may be represented by a union.

Low-quality jobs, which should be minimized, are those that pay minimal state or federal wages with few or no benefits, may be temporary or part-time and are generally non-union.

Parity goals should be based on the race, gender and income-level composition of green job holders, relative to the demographics of the local community site.

For example, striving for racial parity in hiring in a local community with a racial composition of 60 percent people of color would call for significant progress in reaching that 60 percent goal for new-hires and contracts provided to people of color, especially signatories of a master agreement.

• Expansion of employer-sponsored benefits

The quantity and quality of employer-sponsored benefits, as well as the number of disadvantaged people with access to these benefits should be expanded.

Employer-sponsored benefits include such things as health and disability insurance, retirement funding, vacation and holidays, childcare and transportation supports.

• Elimination of employment barriers and bias faced by disadvantaged communities

Programs will take concrete and successful actions to eliminate barriers and to provide full access to disadvantaged communities.

To do so, it is essential to adequately fund and offer high-quality training programs, job-placement programs and other needed supports to targeted populations.

• Expansion and fulfillment of race and gender parity goals in contracting

Equitable green job initiatives can aspire to the proportional awarding and distribution of all contracts relative to the racial, gender and income-level composition of the communities they serve.

Although strict racial quotas in public contracting and hiring are prohibited by U.S. Supreme Court case law, making significant progress toward, and ultimately reaching, racial and gender parity goals is an essential outcome for an equitable green-jobs initiative.

• Significant expansion of green entrepreneurship in target populations

Disadvantaged communities need to be seeded with meaningful opportunities to start their own green social enterprises that advance Eco-equity.

Social entrepreneurship should operate with an equity screen and be supported with startup capital by banks and the government only if they provide needed goods and/or services to their community.

This helps to restore the wealth that many communities have lost since the great recession or never gained because of the lack of opportunity in our built environment.

A May 2009 report by ARC showed that the sub-prime crisis and ensuing foreclosure debacle has robbed millions of families of color of their homes, and home-ownership was the primary form of security and wealth-building in many communities.

• Creation of healthy and safe workplaces and surrounding environment

Measurable improvements in health, safety and environment must be made that maximize shared well-being through protection and prevention, while minimizing injuries, risks and disparities.

Green job initiatives should be consciously designed to eliminate and prevent any adverse or inequitable health and safety impacts.

• Maximization and equitable distribution of local hiring, contracting and high-level career jobs

The number of local residents and contractors should be maximized (local hires and contracts are those that are provided to people in the local community).

The number of career jobs that are created and filled should be maximized, incentivized and proportionally distributed by race, gender and income level, while the number of low-quality and temporary jobs should be minimized (a career job is a full-time, high-quality job that includes advancement, increasing compensation, permanence and pathways to greater opportunities. It provides long-term economic security to households and communities).

• Expanded educational opportunities and workforce development for disadvantaged communities

High-quality educational opportunities, training programs, and professional-development and workforce-development services should be created that are affordable and accessible to disadvantaged communities.

These programs must emphasize job-readiness skills that connect people to actual available high quality jobs.

Green-Jobs initiatives should also contribute positively to local community development by, for example, expanding affordable housing in healthy environments where families and children can thrive.

Residential weatherization and green buildings must be made accessible to working families of color and households headed by single women.

Housing and public transportation options should be well-planned to minimize costs and commute time, so that the combined shelter and transit costs don’t exceed 40 percent of a family’s take-home pay.

Endless Water Energy

Desalinization:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination

View across a reverse osmosis desalination plant in July 2010.
Photo by James Grellier
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Reverse_osmosis_desalination_plant.JPG

Invisible capital: A barrier for businesses owned by people of color and women

The next generation of social enterprises must be designed to benefit all people and the full communities they serve, including those most disadvantaged

Shared prosperity and communal wealth-building are the foundations of green enterprises that embrace Eco-equity.

Outdated or ineffective programs that target disadvantaged communities but don’t address the entrepreneurial and socio-political barriers built up by enduring structural inequality must be replaced with programs that include entrepreneurial literacy, meaningful institutional collaboration, strong curricula and sufficient funding.

——-

The exalted status of entrepreneurs and small businesses is part and parcel of the myth of meritocracy and the American dream, explains author, writer, consultant and speaker Chris Rabb in his book “Invisible Capital: How Unseen Forces Shape Entrepreneurial Opportunity.”

A Chicago native, Rabb is a visiting Researcher at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and a Demos Fellow.

Rabb coined the term “invisible capital” to represent “the unseen forces that dramatically impact entrepreneurial viability when a good attitude, a great idea, and hard work simply aren’t enough,” according to a Google bio.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demos_%28U.S._think_tank%29

http://www.invisiblecapital.com

http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Capital-Unseen-Entrepreneurial-Opportunity/dp/1605093076

http://books.google.com/books/about/Invisible_Capital.html?id=-C4Gwixa5EcC
http://www.invisiblecapital.com/abouttheauthor

——-

Equal opportunity:

These federal laws, won by the civil rights movement, were designed to ensure equal access to federally funded programs, employment and an education, regardless of race, ethnicity or gender.

Discrimination is defined in two ways:

(1) As individual or programmatic acts that intentionally exclude certain groups
(2) Acts or practices that have a disparate impact on a group.

These laws, in theory, are very powerful, but in practice, are still imperfect and leave many groups unprotected.

They are also insufficiently enforced, and the burden of evidence is great.

Nevertheless, they provide an opportunity to achieve demands for equity already guaranteed in our laws.

Those that ignore federal requirements risk losing their funding, a tactic also known as the clawback.

Therefore, much of the first equity goal for racial and gender parity in the Green Economy is a federally protected and mandated right accorded to all in this country, explicitly based on race, ethnicity and gender.

Affirmative action

President Obama signed Executive Order 11246 which requires the use of affirmative action in hiring contractors who receive a certain amount of federal funds.

This handle, federal in scope, applies only to the construction sector.

The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs maintains meticulous participation goals for racial groups and women, and carefully distinguishes the goals from racial or gender quotas.

As with anti-discrimination laws, this is difficult to enforce because contractors are expected to comply in “good faith.”

Because enforcement mechanisms are weak – community-based documentation, organizing and advocacy for government accountability – is important for generating public scrutiny of both government and corporate actions.

The Clawback

The clawback is a strategy defined by good jobs first when a government takes steps to recoup subsidies paid to a company that does not fulfill its job creation or other promises.

Community and labor organizers have successfully used this tactic in stopping federally funded corporate initiatives that adversely affect community residents or workers.

Local Hiring and Training

A variety of project-based handles have been used to overcome barriers to green employment for people of color, women, ex-prisoners and public assistance recipients.

These handles can be used alone – or in combination with other local or federal handles.

For example, Best Value Contracting (BVC) is a method used by local governments to stipulate requirements for winning contract bids, beyond just low cost.

BVCs can be used to create equity in green contracts and rewards high-quality standards.

• Pennsylvania’s public works projects use BVC in their Requests For Proposals (RFPS), awarding points to those they refer to as “disadvantaged businesses” this qualification is granted to businesses that are certified as small business enterprises owned by persons of color or women; and to businesses that “have suffered chronic and substantial racial or ethnic prejudice or cultural bias in the U.S. due to the business person’s color, ethnic origin, or gender” which “must have negatively impacted the business’ establishment or growth”

• Washington’s regional transit development includes a requirement that contractors use Project Labor Agreements (PLAS) in their RFPS.

• Madison, Wisconsin, enacted a BVC ordinance in 2006, which allowed the city to require contractors to prequalify themselves by presenting the city with an affirmative action plan.

Wage and Hour Standards

There is a variety of both federal and local handles in this category.

The preeminent regulation on the books is the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which prescribes that workers must receive at least the federal prevailing minimum wage per hour and overtime of one-and-a-half times the rate of the regular rate.

Unfortunately, this area suffers from weak enforcement: the General Accountability Office (GAO) and a report by Los Angeles labor educators recently exposed pervasive wage theft and an ineffective response system by the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division.

Other handles in this category include the Davis-Bacon Act, which requires payment of prevailing wages — this legislation is federal in scope but applies only to construction sectors.

Living wage ordinances are local in scope, applying to employers who receive local government funding.

They are being enacted through organizing campaigns in over 120 cities.

Safety and health standards

This federal handle was enacted by the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970 and enforced by OSHA under the DOL.

As the name suggests, the act establishes enforceable health and safety standards for various occupations.

Employers who do not meet these standards can be subject to sanctions.

However, for this law to be effective, inspection and enforcement are key, both of which are often lacking unless communities engage in effective organizing and advocacy to ensure compliance.

Labor Peace Agreements

The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) of 1935 protects the rights of workers to organize in order to bargain collectively for pay and working conditions.

Employer infractions of NLRA are now considered part of the cost of doing business, and workers are finding it harder than ever to unionize their workplaces.

However, local labor peace agreements have been brokered that protect the fundamental right of a worker to self-organize.

Oregon Tradeswomen partnered in the Clean Energy Works initiative in Portland, Oregon - Pix courtesy Green For All

Oregon Tradeswomen partnered in the Clean Energy Works initiative in Portland, Oregon.
Photo courtesy of Green For All
Via Green Equity Toolkit

Oregon enacted the Worker Freedom Act, which made it illegal for bosses to punish employees who refuse to attend captive audience meetings, where the employers proselytize against labor unions to their workers before a union election.

Some 39 similar bills have been pushed through state chambers in New Hampshire, Michigan, Vermont, Colorado and West Virginia by labor and community organizers.

Labor Laws and Labor Unions:

National Labor Relations Act

Pres. Roosevelt signs the National Labor Relations Act

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signs the National Labor Relations Act on July 9, 1935. Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins (right) looks on.

National Labor Relations Act
http://www.nlrb.gov/national-labor-relations-act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Labor_Relations_Act

National Labor Relations Board (NRLB)
http://www.nlrb.gov

AFL-CIO and others support the Employee Free Choice Act that would update the NRLA (Link to AFL-CIO website)

Legislative Guide Chapter 3: Freedom to Form a Union
http://www.aflcio.org/content/download/1726/15543/file/legislative_guide_chap3.pdf
Wikipedia page about the Employee Free Choice Act:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Employee_Free_Choice_Act

Scroll down for more union-related information including the AFL-CIO and Working America

Green Equity Toolkit Labor graphic 1Green Equity Toolkit Labor graphicLiving Wages a Thing of the Past

Green startups

Various programs and tax incentives exist to incubate and encourage green entrepreneurial initiatives.

Most are federal in scope; some are state-specific.

Some focus on encouraging people of color and women to start their own green business.

An example of a Green Jobs training initiative is in Oakland, California

The Oakland Green Corps was created through collaboration between the Ella Baker Center For Human Rights, the city of Oakland and non-profit training providers.

The program, based on the Pinderhughes Model, aims to provide green pathways out of poverty for youth who face barriers to employment.

Students are provided with job training and ongoing support services, as well as on-the-job training.

The three-month program includes the following:

• Basic literacy in math and English

• Life skills and job readiness training

• Environmental sustainability and environmental justice

• Financial management

• OSHA safety training certification

• Labor unions 101 and how to get into apprenticeship programs

• Other support services, such as childcare and transportation stipends

• Paid on-the-job training for three four-week rotations, where students earn $9 per hour

Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Logo

Ella Baker Center for Human Rights and Oakland Green Jobs Corps:
http://www.EllaBakerCenter.org
http://www.facebook.com/ellabakercenter
https://twitter.com/#!/ellabakercenter

Jakada Imani, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Executive Director
Jakada Imani, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Executive Director

Late Human Rights Champion Ella Baker

http://www.youtube.com/ellabakercenter
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellabakercenter

Models of urban farms that provide fresh foods for their community as well as an avenue for community wealth-building are proliferating across the country, from Brooklyn to San Francisco

A good example, in the heart of the national former automobile manufacturing center, is the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN), a coalition working together to build a green oasis of food security in Detroit’s black community.

The program includes the following components:

• Influencing public policy

• Promoting urban agriculture

• Encouraging cooperative buying

• Promoting healthy eating habits

• Promoting equitable and sustainable public policy

• Facilitating mutual support and collective action among members

• Encouraging youth to pursue careers in agriculture, aquaculture, animal husbandry, bee-keeping and other food-related industries.

Their key program is the founding and operation of D-Town Farm, a two-acre model urban farm located in Rouge Park in northwestern Detroit.

The farm consists of organic vegetable plots, two beehives, a hoop house for year-round food production and a composting operation, according to their website.

Detroit Black Community Food Security Network
3800 Puritan
Detroit, MI
48238

1-313-345-3663

Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and their three areas of activities: Urban agriculture, policy development and cooperative buying
http://detroitblackfoodsecurity.org/index.html

Detroit related sites:
African Food Basket
The Black Oaks Center
Detroit Food Policy Council
Fair Food Network
Great Lakes Bioneers
Growing Food and Justice for All Initiative
Growing Power
HABESHA, Inc.
Save Black Farmers
Food Security article by DBCFSN’s own Dr. Monica White

In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Green Economy innovator Will Allen was profiled in the September-October 2008 issue of Colorlines Magazine.

With his daughter Erika, he founded an organization named Growing Power to promote food justice through urban farming in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

In 2012, Will Allen received the Security Benefit Corporation Award for Outstanding Service in Public Education.

Growing Power operates an urban farm that grows and sells organic fruits and vegetables popular in black southern cuisine and in local Hmong and Oneida Indian communities.

The farm also distributes their produce to the community through a market basket program, where for $12, a family receives a bag of organic foods weekly.

Unique to Allen’s farm is the innovation of an aquaponics program, to raise tilapia fish in tanks with water filtered by the vegetables.

The fish waste, which is rich in nutrients, is then used to fertilize the plants.

“It’s about reinventing the way food is grown, showing people that we could do it in urban areas too,” Erika Allen told Colorlines. “We’re working to provide the fertility and systems so that you can grow anywhere from rooftops to parking lots and containers, so that people can be self-sufficient in their food needs.”


The NEA Foundation presented Will Allen, CEO of Growing Power, Inc, with the 2012 Security Benefit Corporation Award for Outstanding Service in Public Education

http://www.neafoundation.org/pages/educators/awards/the-award-for-outstanding-service-to-public-education
http://www.indiebound.org/book/9781592407101

Growing Power, Inc.:
http://www.GrowingPower.org
http://www.facebook.com/growingpower
https://twitter.com/#!/growingpower
http://www.flickr.com/photos/growingpower
http://www.growingpower.org/blog

Growing Power, Inc.
Milwaukee Headquarters
5500 W. Silver Spring Drive
Milwaukee, WI
53218

414-527-1546 (office)
414-527-1908 (fax)

Growing Power, Inc.
Chicago Projects Office
3333 S. Iron Street
Chicago, IL
60608

773-376-8882 (office)

Grim Labor stats:

• More than 70 percent of the population is white and the poverty rate is well below the national average.

The New York Times reported states with the worst unemployment rates created very little jobs with stimulus monies.

Michigan, which has one of the nation’s worst unemployment rates (at 15.3 percent in September 2009) created or saved 400 jobs, according to the times.

Nevada, with the second highest rate at 13.3 percent, reported only 159 jobs, and Rhode Island only six.

Of course, no data is available regarding who the recipients of those jobs were, or their race, gender or economic need.

This is the worst economic downturn our country has experienced since the recession of the early 1980s and is flirting dangerously to parallel the Great Depression of the 1930s.

What will our generation remember when we look back at this time?

Did we seize the opportunity of the great recession to bring about a green transformation to sustain all peoples, especially those most distressed?

We must act together to demand tracking equity data in the recovery, green or otherwise.

Below there are many more important links and information in the Green Equity ToolKit – but first – workers of America must unite under the Power of Unions:

Support Labor Unions:

Georgia AFL-CIO Banner

AFL-CIO ON Evil Georgia Senate Bill 469:
http://www.aflcio.org/Blog/Political-Action-Legislation/Proposed-Georgia-Law-Makes-Picketing-Illegal-Sit-Downs-a-Felony

AFL-CIO Georgia webpages:
Mission Statement

The Georgia AFL-CIO is the state federation of labor representing over 80,000 members of more than 220 unions throughout Georgia.
The mission of the Georgia AFL-CIO is to improve the lives of working families – to bring economic justice to the workplace and social justice to our state and the nation
http://www.ga.aflcio.org/georgialabor

AFL-CIO Banner

AFL-CIO National Homepage:
http://www.aflcio.org

AFL-CIO on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/aflcio

AFL-CIO on Twitter
https://twitter.com/#!/AFLCIO
@AFLCIO
The AFL-CIO, America’s Union Movement.

AFL-CIO Issues

Read AFL-CIO blog for daily updates on news important to working families
http://blog.aflcio.org

Richard L.Trumka, AFL-CIO President

AFL-CIO President Richard L. Trumka on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/#!/richardtrumka
@RichardTrumka

Representing more than 12M workers promoting workplace rights, a voice on the job and economic fairness for all working people

AFL-CIO on youtube
http://www.youtube.com/AFLCIONow

AFL-CIO photos on flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/afl-cio/

AFL-CIO RSS feed link:
http://www.aflcio.org/rss/feed/Blog

Working America homepage:
http://www.workingamerica.org

Georgia AFL-CIO
http://georgiaunions.org
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001676434256
https://twitter.com/#!/georgiaunions

State of Georgia Federation:

Georgia State AFL-CIO
501 Pulliam St., S.W.
Suite 549
Atlanta, GA
30311

http://www.ga.aflcio.org/georgialabor
404-525-2793 (office)
404-525-5983 (fax)

——-

Albany/Southwest Georgia Labor Council, AFL-CIO
500 Cordele Road
Albany, GA
31705

http://ga.aflcio.org/78
229-432-0799 (office)
229-435-3273 (fax)

Meetings:
5:30 p.m.
3rd Monday

UA Local 72 Union Hall
1900 Clark Ave.
Albany, GA

——-

Atlanta-North Georgia Labor Council, AFL-CIO
501 Pulliam St., S.W.
Suite 517
Atlanta, GA
30312

http://www.ga.aflcio.org/atlclc
404-525-3559 (office)
678-623-0158 (fax)

Meetings:
6 p.m.
2nd Wednesday

IBEW Auditorium
501 Pulliam St., S.W.
Atlanta, GA

——-

Augusta Federation of Trades, AFL-CIO
1250 Reynolds St.
Augusta, GA
30901

http://ga.aflcio.org/augusta
706-722-6357 (office)
706-724-9792 (fax)

Meetings:
6 p.m.
1st Thursday

1250 Reynolds St.
Augusta, GA

——-

Central Georgia Federation of Trades and Labor Council
501 Pulliam St.
Suite 511
Atlanta, GA
30312

http://ga.aflcio.org/82
404-584-0005 (office)
404-584-0009 (fax)

Meetings:
6 p.m.
1st Thursday

IBEW Union Hall
1046 Patterson St.
Macon, GA

——-

Savannah Regional Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO
P.O. Box 22654
Savannah, GA
31403

http://www.savannahclc.org
912-507-8037 (office)
425-650-9374 (fax)

Meetings:
5:30 p.m.
1st Wednesday

IBEW
508 Union Hall
1526 Dean Foret Road
Savannah, GA

——-

South Georgia Labor Council, AFL-CIO
P.O. Box 1447
Valdosta, GA
31603

http://ga.aflcio.org/85
229-559-7108 (office)

Meetings:
7 p.m.
3rd Monday

CWA Union Hall
111 Howard St.
Valdosta, GA

——-

Southeast Georgia Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO
P.O. Box 5772
St. Marys, GA
31558

http://ga.aflcio.org/86
912-882-9377 (office)
912-882-4882 (fax)

Meetings:
5 p.m.
1st Thursday

TWU Local 526
107 Industrial Drive
Suite B
Saint Marys, GA

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U.S. Labor Against the War logo

U.S. Labor Against the War:
http://uslaboragainstwar.org

Contact info:
http://uslaboragainstwar.org/contactus.php

Mission Statement:
http://uslaboragainstwar.org/article.php?id=4499

Key Wiki
http://keywiki.org/images/0/00/Uslaw.JPG
http://keywiki.org/index.php/US_Labor_Against_the_War

Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/LA-US-Labor-Against-War/244991928872304

List of Affiliate unions, more:
http://www.pennfedbmwe.org/docs/reference/us_law/Affiliations.082508.pdf

202-521-5265

USLAW
1718 M Street N.W. #153
Washington, DC
20036

U.S. Labor Against the War is a national organization of affiliated unions, labor councils, regional labor bodies, allied constituency group organizations, worker centers, ad hoc labor antiwar committees and other labor groups.
It was founded in January of 2003 to organize in the labor movement to prevent the war launched by President Bush in March of 2003.

U.S. Labor Against the War is a partner organization of the Institute for Policy Studies.

USLAW was founded at a Chicago conference in January of 2003 by between 125 and 200 delegates from unions, labor councils, regional and state labor bodies, allied constituency groups, labor antiwar committees, worker centers and other labor organizations.

http://declarationofpeace.org/endorsements/us-labor-against-the-war
http://peacenews.org/2012/02/military-union-busting-thats-disgusting-us-labor-against-the-war
http://www.1199seiu.org/support_u_s_labor_against_the_war_wisconsin_teachers_union_leader_at_1199_hq_nov_10

WorkingAmerica.org has been updated with more resources to help you make a difference.
More member voices: Our 3 million members are front and center. You can vote on your priorities and hear stories from people like you.
The issues that matter: Get the latest information on issues like good jobs, health care and education, with frequently updated posts from our Main Street blog.
The chance to take action: Get involved with campaigns like Not Your ATM, the Bad Boss Contest and the 9 Demands of the 99%.
State by state, the difference we make: At our state pages, you can get the latest news on what’s happening in your state and the victories our members are winning for working families.
Member benefits: Find out what Working America membership means for you with a clear explanation of the discounts, services and resources we offer.

Bring Your Family and Friends to Working America

Working America: Building Worker Power in Cities and States

Working America: Building a Better Future for Working Families – Community Affiliate of the AFL-CIO

Working American on Facebook
Working America
http://www.workingamerica.org
Working America Main Street Blog
http://www.workingamerica.org/blog

I am Working America:
http://www.iamworkingamerica.com
I am Working America on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/#!/WorkingAmerica

AFL/CIO
http://www.aflcio.org

Friends and Family Campaign for Working America

Working America
815 16th St., N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20006

Contact:
Christian Norton
Communications Director
Working America

http://www.workingamerica.org
202-637-5137
info@workingamerica.org

Job contact:
http://www.workingamerica.org/about/jobs.cfm
Fill out the form
Send a cover letter and résumé
workamerjobs@aflcio.org
Canvass Organizer” in subject line

Colorado:

Denver Office
140 Sheridan Blvd. #201
Denver, CO
80226

303-935-2776
denver@workingamerica.org

Florida:

Orlando Office
231 East Colonial Drive
Suite 100
Orlando, Florida
32801

407-835-9797
orlando@workingamerica.org

Maine:

Maine Office
999 Forest Ave.
Suite 207
Portland, ME
04103

207-541-9415
maine@workingamerica.org

Michigan:

Michigan Office
210 Collingwood Drive
Suite 200
Ann Arbor, MI
48103

734-222-6496
annarbor@workingamerica.org

Minnesota:

Twin Cities Office
4407 East Lake St.
Minneapolis, MN
55406

612-331-5800
twincities@workingamerica.org

New Mexico:

New Mexico Office
3228 Los Arboles Ave NE #A
Albuquerque, NM
87107

505-255-2127
newmexico@workingamerica.org

Ohio:

Cleveland Office
2529 Detroit Ave
Cleveland, OH
44113

216-781-0376
cleveland@workingamerica.org

Columbus Office
460 E. Main St.
Columbus, OH
43215

614-223-2194
columbus@workingamerica.org

Oregon:

Portland Office
10 N Russell Street
Suite 150
Portland, OR
97227

503-224-1004
portland@workingamerica.org

Pennsylvania:

Philadelphia Office
3031 Bldg A Walton Road
Suite 302
Plymouth Meeting, PA
19462

610-940-5848
philly@workingamerica.org

Pittsburgh Office
60 Blvd. of the Allies
Suite 210
Pittsburgh, PA
15222

412-471-0285
pittsburgh@workingamerica.org

Washington:

Seattle Office
820 NE 45th St
Seattle, WA 98105

206-632-7734
seattlephones@workingamerica.org

Wisconsin:

Milwaukee Office
WI State AFL-CIO
6333 W. Blue Mound Rd.
Milwaukee, WI
53213

414-257-9433
milwaukee@workingamerica.org
——-

Green-Collar Jobs Overview and other related links:

Fight for racial, green and social equity

Green Team CollageGeorgia Grassroots Nonprofits Unite!
A Green Leadership Initiative
From Atlanta, Georgia to Augusta, Georgia
“Integrate the Green”

“The Solar Retrofit”
Georgia nonprofits replacing costly old electric water heaters with efficient low-cost solar powered water heaters.
Good for the folks and good for our environment.

Great Green Ideas
The creation of “Green Jobs” in your community

Green Grassroots Team in Georgia:
Minority-Owned Green Businesses across Georgia including Atlanta and Augusta

https://claimingastreetnamedking.wordpress.com/2012/03/11/GrassrootsNonprofitsUnite_GeorgiaGreenLeadershipInitiative
http://www.scribd.com/fullscreen/84897769?access_key=key-105vw5c7sn76vz2p1ix9

Georgia Green Grassroots Team:

Homero Leon and family

Homero Leon, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
770-309-6216

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/homero-leon/32/b99/695

Rev. Terence A. Dicks

Rev. Terence A. Dicks
Augusta, Georgia
706-306-5731

TerenceDicks@gmail.com

“Claiming A Street Named King” on YouTube
News Story: Terence Dicks appointed chairman of Augusta Human Relations Commission
Terence Dicks on Facebook
Terence Dicks on Flickr – PhotoStream
Terence Dicks on Flickr – Profile
Terence Dicks on Google
Terence Dicks on LinkedIn
Terence Dicks on MySpace
Terence Dicks on Twitter
Terence Dicks on Viddler
Terence Dicks on Yahoo

Step One:
Community Education about the Green Economy and Green Energy, to raise consciousness, workshops, literature, meetings, advocate, educate, inspire, motivate, etc.

Step Two:
Create and develop a Green Enterprise locally, like a weatherization of homes, retrofitting solar water heaters.
Do a Business Plan.
Find investors, Angel Investors, Government Funders, Donors, and Foundations

Step Three:
Attract Green Industry to the region with minority ownership. At least part minority ownership.
Seek funding from sources like initiatives announced by Pres. Obama and the feds.

Georgia Green Grassroots Team offers thanks to partners like Dr. Yomi Noibi, executive director of Environmental Community Action, Inc. (ECO-Action).

ECO-Action is committed to working with vulnerable communities to ensure safe and healthy environments

                           — Dr. Yomi Noibi, executive director of Environmental Community Action, Inc. (ECO-Action)

Dr. Yomi Noibi
yomi@eco-act.org
404-584-6499
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/yomi-noibi/8/b0b/bbb
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=26645759

ECO-Action
http://www.eco-act.org

Environmental Community Action is located in the Grant Park neighborhood in Southeast Atlanta

ECO-Action
250 Georgia Avenue, SE
Suite 309
Atlanta, GA
30312


ECO-Action
http://www.eco-act.org


ECO-Action Blog
http://eco-act.blogspot.com
ECO-Action on Myspace
http://www.Myspace.com/eco_act

——-

Green for All
http://www.greenforall.org
http://www.greenforall.org/resources/green-collar-jobs-overview
http://www.greenforall.org/blog
https://www.facebook.com/greenforall
https://twitter.com/#!/greenforall
http://www.youtube.com/GREENFORALL
http://www.flickr.com/photos/green4all

Green for All
1611 Telegraph Avenue, Suite 600
Oakland, California
94612

510-663-6500
Contact Green for All

The Building Trades Union AFL-CIO
http://www.bctd.org
http://www.facebook.com/AmericasBuildingTradesUnions

“Ensuring that Green Jobs are Quality Jobs”
Center for Community Innovation
April 2009
http://communityinnovation.berkeley.edu/reports/green%20jobs.pdf

Edward B. Barber
“A Global Green New Deal”
United Nations Environment Programme report
April 2009
http://www.unep.org/greeneconomy/portals/30/docs/GGND-Report-April2009.pdf

“Greening of the World of Work: Implications for O*NET-SOC and New and Emerging Occupation”
O*NET Research and Technical Reports
February 2009
http://www.onetcenter.org/reports/Green.html

Raquel Pinderhughes
“Green Collar Jobs: An Analysis of the Capacity of Bay Area Green Businesses to Provide High Quality Work Force Opportunities for Low-Income Men and Women with Barriers to Employment”
2007
http://bss.sfsu.edu/raquelrp/documents/v13FullReport.pdf

Green Jobs: A Pathway to a Strong Middle Class”
Office of the Vice President of the United States
Middle Class Task Force Staff Report
February 2009
http://www.whitehouse.gov/assets/documents/mctf_one_staff_report_final.pdf

Phil Mattera
“High Road or Low Road? Job Quality in the New Green Economy
Good Jobs First
February 2009
http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/pdf/gjfgreenjobsrpt.pdf

Nicole C. Mason
“Race, Gender and the Recession: Job Creation and Employment”
Women of Color Policy Network
May 2009
http://wagner.nyu.edu/wocpn/reports/Race_Gender_and_the_Recession_Job_Creation

Author and Green Jobs Advocate Van Jones

“The Green Collar Economy: In Search of Eco-Equity” in Applied Research Center’s “Compact for Racial Justice – An Agenda for Fairness and Unity” by Van Jones
Applied Research Center
November 2008
http://www.arc.org/images/fr08/arc_compact_11209.pdf
http://www.arc.org

“Ensuring that Green Jobs are Quality Jobs”
Center for Community Innovation
April 2009
http://communityinnovation.berkeley.edu/reports/green%20jobs.pdf

“Bringing Home the Green Recovery: A User’s Guide”
PolicyLink and Green for All
http://www.policylink.org/atf/cf/%7B97C6D565-BB43-406D-A6D5-ECA3BBF35AF0%7D/BringingHometheGreenRecovery.pdf

“Ensuring Equal Opportunity in Our Nation’s Economic Recovery Efforts”
The Opportunity Agenda
May 2009
http://fairrecovery.org/OMBGuidanceFINAL.pdf

Amaad Rivera
“The Silent Depression: The State of the Dream 2009”
United for a Fair Economy
January 2009
http://www.faireconomy.org/files/pdf/state_of_dream_2009.pdf

Dedrick Muhammad and Barbara Ehrenreich
“The Recession’s Racial Divide”
Institute for Policy Studies
September 2009
http://www.ips-dc.org/articles/the_recessions_racial_divide

“Labor Law Reform, One State at a Time”
http://www.labornotes.org/node/2392

National Labor Relations Board (NRLB)
http://www.nlrb.gov

“Broken laws, unprotected workers: Violations of employment and labor laws in America’s cities”
September 2009
http://www.UnprotectedWorkers.org

U.S. Dept. of Labor Logo
The Davis-Bacon and Related Acts (DBRA)
http://www.DOL.gov/compliance/laws/comp-dbra.htm

U.S. Department of Labor
http://www.DOL.gov

Recovery.gov is the U.S. government’s official website that provides easy access to data related to Recovery Act spending and allows for the reporting of potential fraud, waste, and abuse
http://www.Recovery.Gov

Report Fraud, Waste and Abuse
http://www.recovery.gov/Contact/ReportFraud/Pages/Report_Fraud.aspx

Applied Research Center (ARC): Racial Justice Through Media, Research and Activism

http://www.arc.org
http://www.ARC.org/greenjobs
http://www.arc.org/content/blogsection/4/200
http://www.facebook.com/arc.org

https://twitter.com/#!/racialjustice
@racialjustice

ColorLines Banner

The Applied Research Center, a racial justice think-tank
Publisher of Colorlines.com

ARC Racial Justice Leadership Action Network
http://www.arc.org/content/view/27/43

Nov. 2012 ARC Conference in Baltimore, Maryland
http://arc.org/facingrace

ARC Executive Director Rinku Sen

Rinku Sen, ARC Executive Director
http://colorlines.com/archives/author/rinku-sen

http://rinkusen.com
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/rinku-sen/7/334/9a3
https://twitter.com/#!/arc_rinkusen
http://www.facebook.com/people/Rinku-Sen/674848566
https://play.google.com/store/books/author?id=Rinku+Sen
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rinku_Sen
http://urbanhabitat.org/20years/sen
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rinku-sen/casting-a-wider-net-for-g_b_355521.html

Rinku Sen at pop tech previewRinku Sen is the president and executive director of the Applied Research Center (ARC) and publisher of ColorLines magazine.
A leading figure in the racial justice movement, Rinku has positioned ARC as the home for media and activism on racial justice.
She has extensive practical experience on the ground, with expertise in race, feminism, immigration, and economic justice.
Over the course of her career, Rinku has woven together journalism and organizing to further social change.
She also has significant experience in philanthropy, as vice chair of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, and Advisory Committee member of the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity.
Previously, she was the co-director of the Center for Third World Organizing.

Dominique Apollon, ARC Research Director
dapollon@arc.org


http://www.arc.org/content/view/547/


http://www.linkedin.com/pub/dominique-apollon/4/551/71b
http://www.facebook.com/dapollon?sk=wall
https://twitter.com/#!/arc_dom

Green Equity Toolkit Author Yvonne Yen Liu

Yvonne Yen Liu, toolkit author
http://colorlines.com/archives/author/yvonne-liu/
http://www.yvonnegraphy.com
https://twitter.com/#!/yvonnegraphy
https://www.facebook.com/yvonneyenliu

Green Equity Toolkit Author Yvonne Yen Liu photo on Google

https://plus.google.com/108178754676259305113/about?hl=en
http://feeds.feedburner.com/yvonnegraphy

Green Equity Toolki Author Terry Keleher

Terry Keleher, toolkit author
http://www.arc.org/content/view/45/43/
http://colorlines.com/archives/author/terry-keleher/
https://twitter.com/#!/TerryKeleher

Christina Chen, Research Assistant
http://www.facebook.com/people/Christina-Chen/114349

——-

We continue honoring Georgia civil rights pioneer – Ms. Cora Lee Johnson – president and founder of Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc. and TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs:

Cora Lee Johnson is featured in two books that honor women who have dared to dream and have made a great difference in American and World history:

Cora Lee Johnson is among courageous women featured in the book "I Dream a World"

The coffee table bookI Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America tells the stories of heroic black women in America – in their own words – including Cora Lee Johnson of Soperton, Georgia.
Photography by Pulitzer Prize-winner Brian Lanker
Edited by Barbara Summers
Foreword by Maya Angelou

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/i-dream-a-world-brian-lanker/1002037727
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/i-dream-a-world-brian-lanker/1014891500

Barnes and Noble Overview:

First published in 1989, I Dream a World, a collection of 75 portraits, has become a landmark in publishing history.
Now the 10th anniversary of this book is being celebrated with this completely revised and updated edition that charts the achievements of a remarkable group of African-American women and their continued impact on the world.
Many changes have occurred since Brian Lanker set out to capture the faces of both the prominent and unsung women who’ve made a difference.
Sadly, many of the original 76 women are no longer among us, including Septima Clark, Barbara Jordan, Clara McBride (Mother) Hale, and Betty Shabazz.
But, as this new edition reveals, all of them have left behind an enduring legacy for future generations.
Most importantly, in revising and updating I Dream a World, we celebrate not only the event of its publication, but the continued achievements of an extraordinary group of women who remain vitally alive as role models for the next century.
A celebration of great African-American women, I Dream a World presents compelling portraits of 75 women who have changed our nation and our times.
This handsome volume will be cherished as a tribute to some of the most inspiring individuals in the ranks of black history and the women’s movement.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble:
Photographer Brian Lanker’s “I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America” is a classic collection of photographs and first-person remembrances that celebrates the invaluable contributions of African-American women to the arts, literature, politics, education, athletics, and virtually every other aspect of society.

Publishers Weekly:
This companion volume to an exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C., documents the aspirations and achievements of 75 black women – from “unsung heroine” Priscilla L. Williams (“I had fourteen children. Seven of them was my sister’s”) to former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm – in the arts, politics, business, academia, athletics and other fields.
Photographs by Pulitzer Prize-winner Lanker are often striking, quietly revealing pride of character, whether borne with predatorial glamour (Leontyne Price) or guileless pleasure (Gwendolyn Brooks).
His verbal portraits, spoken in the words of his subjects, are largely a disappointment, however–brief, surprisingly full of platitudes and lacking in personal signature, they tell a dramatic story of struggle and success in a flatly generic voice.
But notable exceptions, such as law professor Eleanor Holmes Norton, comment on their lives with uncompromising intelligence:
Black people get their moral authority in this country not simply because they have suffered, but because they understand the suffering of other people

Quotes from Cora Lee Johnson:

I am a person. I have feelings. I have needs. I have wants. I’m sittin’ here and nobody sees me. Everybody just looks over me and walks on past because I’m black, because I’m a woman, because I’m poor, because I have no education. But I’m still here.”

                                                        — Cora Lee Johnson (born 1925), an African American social activist
As quoted in “I Dream a World” by Brian Lanker (1989)
A poor, uneducated African American woman from rural Soperton, Georgia, Johnson became an unpaid activist who successfully pressed for changes in social service policy.

http://www.poemhunter.com/quotations/famous.asp?people=Cora%20Lee%20Johnson

Women of Courage: Inspiring Stories from the Women Who Lived Them
By Katherine Martin

http://www.amazon.com/Women-Courage-People-Dare-ebook/dp/B004CYF37U
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004CYF37U/ref=as_li_tf_il?ie=UTF8&tag=wilbookreviews-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B004CYF37U
http://ebookstore.sony.com/ebook/katherine-martin/women-of-courage/_/R-400000000000000127719

Cora Lee Johnson in Book Women in Leadership
http://www.womaninleadership.com/2011/12/book-review-women-of-courage-people-who-dare-series-by-katherine-martin.html

Cora Lee Johnson’s longtime dream of starting a community sewing center became a reality when she was 62 because, although poor and uneducated, she persevered by talking about the center to anyone who would listen.
Men and women both will find inspiration for their own lives in these captivating stories.

Book Review by Maryel McKinley
http://www.awarenessmag.com/janfeb0/JF0_BOOK_REVIEWS.HTML
Women of Courage by Katherine Martin New World Library
An outstanding compilation of 41 inspiring stories by women from all walks of life, who dare to have courage and live their dream.
With chapters that include The Courage to Preserve, The Courage to Listen to Your Heart, The Courage to Challenge, The Courage to Be Vulnerable, and the Courage to Heal, this book makes me proud to be a woman!
With individual uplifting and enlightening stories by Marianne Williamson, Judith Orloff, M.D., Ann Bancroft, Senator Patty Murray, and Barbara De Angelis, “Women of Courage” also includes stories by unsung heroes.
Everyday women like you and I tell their true stories of reaching deep within and garnering their inner strength to overcome challenges and come out ahead of the game.
My very favorite story was written by Cora Lee Johnson, a 70-year-old black woman who, although she had no education and was on welfare, at the age of 62 mustered up the courage to start a nonprofit center for women.
Her sewing center teaches underprivileged women in the ghetto to learn to sew, at no cost to the student.
Cora’s center enables women to get out on their own and break the welfare cycle that has so many families in the grips of its bondage.
I cried when I read Cora’s story and it encouraged me to fight for my dreams.
I now realize that with faith, hope and courage, one woman can accomplish the miraculous, if she listens to her heart.
“Women of Courage” is the first in a series of books put out by New World Library called “People Who Dare”.
I give two thumbs to author Katherine Martin, and applaud her for having the patience and courage to compile such an authentic, inspiring, and unprecedented literary masterpiece.  – Reviewed by Maryel McKinley

——-

USAspending.gov gives details and more info on all government awards (grants etc.)
http://www.usaspending.Gov

U.S. DOL Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
http://www.dol.gov/ofccp

“Job Program Found to Miss Many States That Need it Most”
The New York Times, October 16, 2009
http://www.Nytimes.Com/2009/10/16/us/16stimulus.Html

2012 Atlanta, Georgia: WINDPOWER 2012 Conference June 3-6, 2012

American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)
AWEA WINDPOWER 2012 Conference & Exhibition
Atlanta, Georgia
Sun., June 3, – Wed., June 6, 2012

Georgia World Congress Center
285 Andrew Young International Blvd., NW
Atlanta, Georgia
30313-1591

Entrepreneur and philanthropist Ted Turner will deliver opening remarks at the WINDPOWER 2012 Opening Session in Atlanta, Georgia

Entrepreneur and philanthropist Ted Turner will deliver opening remarks at the WINDPOWER 2012 Opening Session at 8:30 a.m. on Mon., June 4, 2012 in Atlanta Georgia.

The Opening Session is open to all WINDPOWER attendees.

Register by April 9, 2012 to benefit from the early bird registration rates! 
Rates will increase again after June 1, 2012 through on-site registration.
http://windpowerexpo.org/registration/register_now/attendee-registration.cfm

Register by Fax or Mail:
Fax:  (508) 743-9621

2012 WINDPOWER Registration
c/o Convention Data Services
107 Waterhouse Road
Bourne, MA
02532

Phone registration is not available!
Questions:
conference@awea.org
(202) 383-2512
http://windpowerexpo.org/registration/register_now/index.cfm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=W1gpxEevFr0

Wind Powering America:
http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/agricultural/large_wind.asp

American Wind Energy Association
1501 M Street, NW, Suite 1000
Washington, DC
20005

202-383-2500 (office)
202-383-2505 (fax)

windmail@awea.org
websupport@awea.org

A Plan to Power 100 Percent of the Planet with Renewables
Wind, water and solar technologies can provide 100 percent of the world’s energy, eliminating all fossil fuels. Here’s how
By Mark Z. Jacobson and Mark A. Delucchi
October 26, 2009
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=a-path-to-sustainable-energy-by-2030

Green Technology:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_technology
http://www.green-technology.org
http://www.green-technology.org/what.htm

Solar Power:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power


Wind Power:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power

——-

The Brave Life, Crusade and Testimony of Cora Lee JohnsonHonoring Ms. Cora Lee Johnson, president and founder of Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc. and TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs:

Cora Lee Johnson is featured in two books that honor women who have dared to dream and have made a great difference in American and World history:

Cora Lee Johnson is among courageous women featured in the book "I Dream a World"

I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America
Photography by Pulitzer Prize-winner Brian Lanker
Edited by Barbara Summers
Foreword by Maya Angelou

(Pictured on the cover of the book is the late civil rights and education advocate Septima Clark)

Women of Courage: Inspiring Stories from the Women Who Lived Them
By Katherine Martin

TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs

Homero Leon, Jr., pro bono attorney Georgia Legal Services Program
hleon@glsp.org

Marcia Watson, volunteer for Georgia Legal Services Program
MWatson@glsp.org

Wallace Little, educator in Truetlen County
wallacelittle@hotmail.com

TreutCo Training Grassroots Leaders for Green Jobs is a project of the historic nonprofit:

Women sew dolls at the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc.

Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, Inc.
c/o Cora Johnson, Executive Director
104 Martin Luther King Drive
Soperton, Georgia
30457

912-529-6238 (office)

Cora Lee Johnson, member of the Southern Partners Fund
http://www.spfund.org/Members/tabid/55/Default.aspx
http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/ga/rcdi.htm

Cora Lee Johnson of Soperton, Georgia testified about “the struggle to obtain better housing, health care and nutrition” while testifying about “Economic Adjustment and Marginalization” during during a summit about the “Global Campaign for Women’s Human Rights.”

The conference was entitled “From Vienna to Beijing: Copenhagen Hearing on Economic Justice and Women’s Human Rights” at the “United Nations World Summit On Social Development” in Copenhagen in March 1995

To read the original .pdf document with the testimony by Cora Lee Johnson click on this link:

Cora Lee Johnson testifies in Copenhagen
http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/globalcenter/publications/copen.pdf

Cora Lee Johnson, founder of the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, was featured in Mother Jones Magazine in January 1988

Article about Cora Lee Johnson in Mother Jones Magazine click on this link:
http://books.google.com/books?id=L-cDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PT32&ots=U4HADOlQkL&dq=Treutlen%20County%20Community%20Sewing%20Center%20georgia&pg=PT31#v=twopage&q&f=false

Cora Lee Johnson, a native of Treutlen County and lifelong resident of the State of Georgia, has spent the better part of her adult life as a dedicated Christian, advocating for the rights and the better quality of life for poor people.

Through the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center, which she founded, Ms. Johnson is providing training for low-income women to acquire and develop skills for jobs in the local clothing factories.

As a result of her efforts, the poor people of Treutlen County are enjoying subsidized housing, a welfare center for food stamp recipients and a health clinic.

Cora also travels around the country to other communities inspiring others to work to improve their lives.

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/It%27s+Official.+Glory+Foods+Southern+Selections+Is+a+Winner!+New…-a020471138

The Georgia Legal Services Program is building the capacities of rural nonprofit organizations, including the Treutlen County Community Sewing Center in Soperton, to build affordable housing, develop micro enterprises, and provide green job training for low-income residents.

An excerpt from a Chicago Sun-Times newspaper story from August 23, 1991 and written by Lori Rotenberk

Black women gather to `Dream a World’

Museum opens photo exhibit, teen program

Sixteen of the nation’s most influential black women will be in Chicago today to say that dreams are worth the fight.

There are Gwendolyn Brooks, Illinois’ poet laureate, and educator Marva Collins.

Political, social and human rights activists such as Cora Lee Johnson, Johnnie Tillmon Blackston and Jewel Jackson McCabe. Physician Alexa Canady, architect Norma Merrick Sklarek and athlete Wilma Rudolph.

They will attend a reception today for the Chicago Historical Society’s exhibit of photographer Brian Lanker’s “I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America.”

The 75-photo exhibit, which has toured for more than two years and been seen by millions of …

The coffee table book “I Dream a World” tells the stories of heroic black women in America – in their own words – including Cora Lee Johnson of Soperton, Georgia.

Photography by Pulitzer Prize-winner Brian Lanker

Edited by Barbara Summers

Foreword by Maya Angelou

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/i-dream-a-world-brian-lanker/1002037727

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/i-dream-a-world-brian-lanker/1014891500

Barnes and Noble Overview:

First published in 1989, I Dream a World, a collection of 75 portraits, has become a landmark in publishing history.

Now the 10th anniversary of this book is being celebrated with this completely revised and updated edition that charts the achievements of a remarkable group of African-American women and their continued impact on the world.

Many changes have occurred since Brian Lanker set out to capture the faces of both the prominent and unsung women who’ve made a difference.

At least 16 of the original 76 women are no longer among us, including Septima Clark, Barbara Jordan, Clara McBride (Mother) Hale, and Betty Shabazz. But, as this new edition reveals, all of them have left behind an enduring legacy for future generations.

Most importantly, in revising and updating I Dream a World, we celebrate not only the event of its publication, but the continued achievements of an extraordinary group of women who remain vitally alive as role models for the next century.

A celebration of great African-American women, I Dream a World presents compelling portraits of 75 women who have changed our nation and our times.

This handsome volume will be cherished as a tribute to some of the most inspiring individuals in the ranks of black history and the women’s movement.

Editorial Reviews

 Barnes & Noble:

Photographer Brian Lanker’s “I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America” is a classic collection of photographs and first-person remembrances that celebrates the invaluable contributions of African-American women to the arts, literature, politics, education, athletics, and virtually every other aspect of society.

Publishers Weekly:

This companion volume to an exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C., documents the aspirations and achievements of 75 black women – from “unsung heroine” Priscilla L. Williams (“I had fourteen children. Seven of them was my sister’s” sic) to former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm – in the arts, politics, business, academia, athletics and other fields.

Photographs by Pulitzer Prize-winner Lanker are often striking, quietly revealing pride of character, whether borne with predatorial glamour (Leontyne Price) or guileless pleasure (Gwendolyn Brooks).

His verbal portraits, spoken in the words of his subjects, are largely a disappointment, however–brief, surprisingly full of platitudes and lacking in personal signature, they tell a dramatic story of struggle and success in a flatly generic voice.

But notable exceptions, such as law professor Eleanor Holmes Norton, comment on their lives with uncompromising intelligence:

“Black people get their moral authority in this country not simply because they have suffered, but because they understand the suffering of other people”

I am a person. I have feelings. I have needs. I have wants. I’m sittin’ here and nobody sees me. Everybody just looks over me and walks on past because I’m black, because I’m a woman, because I’m poor, because I have no education. But I’m still here.

Cora Lee Johnson (born 1925), an African American social activist

As quoted in “I Dream a World” by Brian Lanker (1989)

A poor, uneducated African American woman from rural Soperton, Georgia, Johnson became an unpaid activist who successfully pressed for changes in social service policy.

http://www.poemhunter.com/quotations/famous.asp?people=Cora%20Lee%20Johnson

“Women of Courage: Inspiring Stories from the Women Who Lived Them” by author Katherine Martin

http://www.amazon.com/Women-Courage-People-Dare-ebook/dp/B004CYF37U

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004CYF37U/ref=as_li_tf_il?ie=UTF8&tag=wilbookreviews-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B004CYF37U

http://ebookstore.sony.com/ebook/katherine-martin/women-of-courage/_/R-400000000000000127719

Cora Lee Johnson in book about Women in Leadership

http://www.womaninleadership.com/2011/12/book-review-women-of-courage-people-who-dare-series-by-katherine-martin.html

Cora Lee Johnson’s longtime dream of starting a community sewing center became a reality when she was 62 because, although poor and uneducated, she persevered by talking about the center to anyone who would listen.

Men and women both will find inspiration for their own lives in these captivating stories.

——-

Book Review by Maryel McKinley

http://www.awarenessmag.com/janfeb0/JF0_BOOK_REVIEWS.HTML

Women of Courage by Katherine Martin New World Library
An outstanding compilation of 41 inspiring stories by women from all walks of life, who dare to have courage and live their dream.

With chapters that include The Courage to Preserve, The Courage to Listen to Your Heart, The Courage to Challenge, The Courage to Be Vulnerable, and the Courage to Heal, this book makes me proud to be a woman!

With individual uplifting and enlightening stories by Marianne Williamson, Judith Orloff, M.D., Ann Bancroft, Senator Patty Murray, and Barbara De Angelis, “Women of Courage” also includes stories by unsung heroes.

Everyday women like you and I tell their true stories of reaching deep within and garnering their inner strength to overcome challenges and come out ahead of the game.

My very favorite story was written by Cora Lee Johnson, a 70-year-old black woman who, although she had no education and was on welfare, at the age of 62 mustered up the courage to start a nonprofit center for women.

Her sewing center teaches underprivileged women in the ghetto to learn to sew, at no cost to the student.

Cora’s center enables women to get out on their own and break the welfare cycle that has so many families in the grips of its bondage.

I cried when I read Cora’s story and it encouraged me to fight for my dreams.

I now realize that with faith, hope and courage, one woman can accomplish the miraculous, if she listens to her heart.

“Women of Courage” is the first in a series of books put out by New World Library called “People Who Dare”.

I give two thumbs to author Katherine Martin, and applaud her for having the patience and courage to compile such an authentic, inspiring, and unprecedented literary masterpiece.  – Reviewed by Maryel McKinley

Spinning Wheel Illusion - Solar Power is the Future Folks

“Green Jobs: A Pathway to a Strong Middle Class”
Office of the Vice President of the United States, Middle Class Task Force Staff Report
February 2009
http://www.whitehouse.gov/assets/documents/mctf_one_staff_report_final.pdf

About TerenceDicks

A three-decade community activist for the Augusta, Georgia area, Rev. Terence A. Dicks is very concerned about civil rights, the needs of inner city and moderate and low-income children, fair civil legal representation for low-income and minorities, and many other issues. Terence has fought for civil representation for the low and moderate income involving cases like domestic violence and landlord disputes. In March 2015, Terence was sworn in for a second term to represent the Richmond County Democratic Party on the Richmond County Board of Elections. Rev. Terence Dicks is "widely-acknowledged for standing up for the rights of the powerless in his community and throughout Georgia," stated a press release on the GeorgiaAdvocates.org website when he was elected chair of the Augusta Human Relations Commission in July 2005. In 1986, Mr. Dicks was co-coordinator of the Mr. James Brown Appreciation Day in Augusta – the first time the town and its people earnestly expressed love and respect to the late great Godfather of Soul. About 5,000 people attended the event on the banks of the Savannah River including Mr. Robert Johnson (founder of Jet Magazine and much more), Mr. Greg Gumbel (who did story on BET), and Mr. Eldrin Bell (then asst. police chief of Atlanta). Along with Terence, the other co-coordinator was his lifelong friend and classmate Mr. Greg Peterson, an investigative journalist and outdoor environment reporter who started his career in Augusta and now lives in Ishpeming, MI in the Upper Peninsula near Lake Superior. The event broke the ice and led months later to the first concert Mr. Brown had ever performed in Augusta – ironically in the civic center that now bears his name (the renaming took another 20 years). Music Industry legends Casey Kasem and Dick Clark recorded radio PSAs to promote the free event. Mayor Charles DeVaney – a fan of Mr. Brown – prevented the celebration from being cancelled at the last minute by waiving the “mandatory” insurance requirements. Mr. Brown and Mr. DeVaney both died unexpectedly a month apart. We continue to love and honor the late great Mr. James Brown, who nearly single-handedly quelled Augusta's race riots and prevent further rioting in the 60, 70s. The "Hardest-Working Man in Show Business" Mr. James Brown made Terence Dicks the manager of his first-ever concert in Augusta, GA - about 6 months after the 1986 James Brown Appreciation Day. The concert was held on Saturday, December 27, 1986 at the civic center named in the godfather of Soul’s honor some 20 years later. Terence was the concert manager, producer and promoter. Tickets were only $15 ensuring all Augustans could afford to attend and the first 500 children under the age of 12 were admitted free in accordance with Mr. Brown’s wishes. Among those performing were Mr. Wilson Pickett, John Marshall, Buzz Clifford and Sequence 8. “Claiming A Street Named King” is an initiative Mr. Dicks started during tenure as chair of Georgia Clients Council. The project is about “taking back the street in by building businesses and homes on the crime-ridden abandoned boulevards that bear the name of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” However the project also has a wider scope. Dicks said the project would welcome claiming back streets named after other civil rights leaders and activists from all backgrounds. For example, the project would welcome groups or persons who want to revitalize streets named for late singer James Brown, the late Coretta Scott King, Muhammad Ali, Jesse Jackson, Grace Lee Boggs, Cesar Chavez and others. “All of these community leaders have messages of hope and accomplishment,” said Dicks, who hopes to hear from the centers, foundations and projects of these community leaders. “People can identify with their day to day struggles,” he said. “Above all they cared about the community they came from,” Dicks said. “They all have made a historic difference.” Reclaiming the streets and heritage of these civic leaders can reinvigorate “economic development and economic empowerment” in each community that honors their work. Rev. Dicks hopes to help others “improve the condition of boulevards named after Martin Luther King, Jr. across Georgia” and the nation. Author Jonathon Tilove “wrote the book that inspired me” entitled "Along Martin Luther King: Travels on Black America's Main Street.” Mr. Dicks hopes those interested will message him thru WordPress/Twitter/Facebook. The project is supported by East Carolina University Professor Derek H. Alderman. “Dr. Alderman is a geographer who has helped us to work on a plan for the redevelopment of the Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards,” Dicks said. “There was a lot of hope around those streets and what he did for me is he reminded me of why we name those streets for Martin Luther King, Jr.," he said. "We are heading into the second or third generation who doesn’t know about Dr. King and his achievements." “The generation that starts it doesn’t have to be the generation who built it,” he said. “We have to keep Dr. King’s work alive – keep it relevant and cogent.” Terence is a longtime member (2004-present) of the Augusta Progressive Religious Coalition. The coalition includes Christians, Jews, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, Hindus, Unitarian Universalists, pagans, and local Yoruba, who practice folk religion from West Africa. Among the many positive aspects of the coalition, Dicks developed a relationship with Omar Neal, who has been the Mayor of Tuskegee, Alabama since Nov. 3, 2008. Mr. Omar Neal was the keynote speaker of the 2011 Martin Luther King Day celebration organized by the Augusta Progressive Religious Coalition on Mon., Jan, 24, 2011 at the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta. After being an independent voter for two decades, Terence joined the Richmond County Democratic Party (RCDP) in 2002. He joined the Democratic Committee of Richmond County that “has jurisdiction over Democratic Party affairs in Richmond County” and a “purpose is to help select and elect Democratic Party Candidates to office” and whose platform includes “those of the Democratic Party of Georgia.” Terence has served as chair of the RCDP Political Action Committee (PAC) and performed duties that included community outreach. Mr. Dicks is member of the Richmond County State Committee (2011-2014) representing the 12th Congressional District. He served for six years (2002-2008) as state chair of the Georgia Clients Council plus served on the council board for eight years (2000-2008). For nearly a decade, Terence has been a board member (2002-present) of Georgia Legal Services Program and served (2005-2010) on the organization’s Georgia Committee on Civil Justice and is on the state bar president advisory committee. The mission of Georgia Legal Services Program is “to provide access to justice and opportunities out of poverty for low-income Georgians.” In 2007, Mr. Dicks founded the non-profit Georgia Center for Children and Education Inc. and serves as the volunteer executive director. The goal of the organization is encouraging parent involvement in education and to support community involvement in public schools. Originally the Center for Children and Education, the project was founded 1997 by Philadelphia, PA attorney Baruch Kintisch, a former staff attorney for Georgia Legal Services After exhaustive planning, Terence helped co-write and secure a $255,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in the spring of 2008 that is being administered by Paine College for the "New Tools, New Visions 2 Augusta" Project and he serves on the project steering committee. Rev. Dicks is a longtime member of the International Leadership Association (2001-present). Mr. Dicks serves as state of Georgia Coordinator (2008-present) for the Progressive Democrats of America (PDA). He joined the national PDA in 2007. For over a decade (1998-2009), Terence served on the board of the Augusta Human Relations Commission including two-terms as chair, three terms as vice-chair. Terence served as a board member (1994-1996) and the second vice president of the Augusta Branch of the NAACP including chair of the fair housing committee. Terence graduated from Westside High School in 1980 during which time he was a member of the WJBF TV-6 Junior Achievement Company that involved filming, editing, producing and hosting 30-minute issue-oriented public service programs that aired on weekends with student-sold commercials. Terence did a summer internship in 1980 – just after graduating from high school – at the Medical College of Georgia Television Production and was taught by people who include the late TV Director Mr. Armond “Brother” Jackson , Jr. - a longtime TV production expert in Augusta including at WRDW TV-12 and WJBF TV-6. During high school and for about 7 years afterward, Terence was a radio announcer at several Augusta radio stations including disc jockey (when records were vinyl 45s), sports, features, talk show and more. The stations included WBIA and WCKJ. Terence worked in production at WAGT-TV with Mr. Frank Crotts including being a live switcher (punching proper buttons to keep shows going and inserting commercials). He also worked at several Augusta restaurants as a chef and bartender.
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